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Why Don't Women Rule the World?
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Why Don't Women Rule the World?
Understanding Women's Civic and Political Choices

First Edition


© 2020 | 536 pages | CQ Press

“[Why Don’t Women Rule the World?] is unlike other texts in its comparative approach and strong theoretical underpinnings. It has interesting pedagogical features that will resonate with comparative scholars, Americanists and those who integrate public policy analysis into the course.”
—Rebecca E. Deen, University of Texas at Arlington  

Why don’t women have more influence over the way the world is structured?  

Written by four leaders within the national and international academic caucuses on women and politics, Why Don't Women Rule the World? helps students to understand how the underrepresentation of women manifests within politics, and the impact this has on policy. Grounded in theory with practical, job-related activities, the book offers a thorough introduction to the study of women and politics, and will bolster students’ political interests, ambitions, and efficacy.  

Key Features: 

  • A comparative perspective expands students’ awareness of their own intersectional identities and the varying effects of patriarchy on women worldwide.  
  • A variety of policy areas highlighted throughout the book illustrates how different theories are applied to real-world situations.            
  • Multiple political engagement activities keep students engaged with the content.
 
Preface
 
Acknowledgements
 
About the Authors
 
CHAPTER 1 • Why Don’t Women Rule the World?
The Creation of Patriarchy  
Reification and the Social Construction of Reality  
Conclusion  
Plan of the Book  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 2 • History of Women in Politics
Colonial History  
The First Wave  
The Second Wave  
The Third Wave  
Conclusion  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 3 • Public Opinion
How Individuals Form Opinions About Gender Issues  
How Sex Influences Public Opinion  
Partisan Preferences and Voting Behavior  
Conclusion  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 4 • Political Ambition
Promoting Women’s Access and Ambition  
Gender Socialization and Political Ambition  
Traditional Family Role Orientations  
The Masculinized Ethos of Politics  
Women’s Gendered Psyche  
Conclusion  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 5 • When Women Run
When and Where Women Candidates Emerge  
Campaign Finance  
Women as Candidates in 2018  
Dismantling the Masculine Ethos of Politics in 2018 and Beyond  
Conclusion  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 6 • Women in Legislatures
Women’s Representation in Legislatures Around the World  
Theories of Representation  
The Effect of Women’s Representation in Legislative Bodies  
The Behavior of Individual Women Legislators  
Women as Institutional Leaders  
Effects Outside the Institution  
How to Increase the Number of Women in Legislative Office  
Conclusion  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 7 • Women in the Executive
Patriarchy, Military Masculinity, and Executive Stereotypes  
Gender Stereotypes in Leadership and the Presidency: Public Support and Media  
Descriptive Representation in Parts of the Executive  
Women in Cabinets: The United States and in Comparative Perspective  
Women’s Policy Agencies  
Women in State and Local Institutions  
Substantive and Symbolic Representation in Executive Institutions  
Conclusion  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 8 • Women in the Judiciary
Women as Lawyers and in Law School  
Women as Public Legal Officials  
The Impact of Women in the Judicial Branch  
The Effect of the Courts on Women’s Lives  
Increasing the Representation of Women in the Judicial Branch  
Conclusion  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 9 • Women in Social Movements
Interest Groups, Social Movements, and Social Movement Organizations  
Challenges for Women’s and Feminist Movements  
Conclusion: Intersectional Resistance in the Post-Trump Era  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activities  
Key Words  
References  
 
CHAPTER 10 • Conclusion
The First Step: Admit That Patriarchy Exists  
The Second Step: Listen to Women’s Complaints and Take Their Anger Seriously  
The Third Step: Understand the Roots of Women’s Anger  
The Fourth Step: Monitor Progress and Backlash to Establish Priorities  
The Fifth Step: Decide What to Do and Act  
Review Questions  
Ambition Activity  
Key Words  
References  
 
Appendices
Appendix 1: Conducting Interviews  
Appendix 2: Comparison  
 
Index

“[Why Don’t Women Rule the World?] is unlike other texts in its comparative approach and strong theoretical underpinnings. It has interesting pedagogical features that will resonate with comparative scholars, Americanists and those who integrate public policy analysis into the course.”

Rebecca E. Deen
University of Texas at Arlington

Jayne Cherie Strachan

Dr. J. Cherie Strachan (PhD, State University of New York at Albany, 2000) is Professor of Political Science at Central Michigan University.  Her research addresses the effects of partisan polarization on elections, the role of civility in a democratic society, and the effect of college-level civic education interventions, deliberative forums, and campus organizations on students’ civic skills and identities.  Her applied pedagogy research has resulted in on-going work with foundations such as the Kettering Foundation, The National Institute for Civil Discourse, and the American Democracy Project.  Strachan currently serves... More About Author

Lori M. Poloni-Staudinger

Dr. Lori M. Poloni-Staudinger (PhD, Indiana University, 2005) is Associate Dean for research, personnel, and graduate programs in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and a Professor of Political Science at Northern Arizona University. Her research and publications focus on social movements, political contention and extra-institutional participation, and political institutions, mainly in Western Europe. Her recent work examines questions around women and political violence. She was a Distinguished Fulbright Fellow at the Diplomatic Academy in Vienna, Austria, and has served as a consultant for the Organization for Security and Co... More About Author

Shannon L. Jenkins

Dr. Shannon Jenkins (PhD, Loyola University Chicago, 2003) is a professor in the Department of Political Science and the Academic Director of Online Learning at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Her research and publications focus on decision making in U.S. state legislatures, with a specific interest in the role of political organizations and gender in shaping outputs in these institutions, and the impact of specific pedagogical practices on student learning outcomes in political science courses. She has been a Fulbright Lecturer at East China University of Political Science and Law in Shanghai in 2012 and at Yokohama National... More About Author

Candice D. Ortbals-Wiser

Candice D. Ortbals  (PhD, Indiana University, 2004) is Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. Her publications relate to state feminism in Spain and gender and terrorism. She has been the newsletter editor, president-elect, and president of the Women’s Caucus of the Midwest Political Science Association. She also served as President for the National Women’s Caucus of Political Science. She has taught at the University of Seville, and she was winner of the Carrie Chapman Catt Prize for Research on Women and Politics. She has also received numerous grants from the government of Spain to study women in regional and... More About Author