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Development Fieldwork
A Practical Guide

First Edition
Edited by:


264 pages | SAGE Publications Ltd
`Every now and then one stumbles across a breath of fresh air and this practical research guide is certainly one of them!.. It will be no doubt refreshing for those of us who keep going to the field and who perhaps have forgotten the human dimension of research. For those who supervise students the book will be a useful source of inspiration.... I shall certainly recommend the book to any of my students' - Development and Change

`Development Fieldwork is an excellent examination of and preparation for development research and will be an invaluable guide to all those entering or considering fieldwork, wherever that may be' - Progress in Development Studies

`I would strongly recommend it as a field textbook across a range of disciplines and topics. The tone is thoughtful, engaging and pragmatic, with all of the chapters contributing equally to a very high quality publication.

It is the best book I have read on fieldwork for a while. It is essential for anyone contemplating 'development' based study, but it also contains a great deal of value and interest to geographers, sociologists and other students working in and on the West' - Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography

'This is an outstanding book, and one that all of us engaged in fieldwork in "developing countries" will want to read and doubtless re-read. Thoughtful, relevant and consistently well-written' - Professor Stuart Corbridge, London School of Economics and University of Miami

'An excellent overview of the pitfalls and problems of fieldwork in remote places... elegant and enjoyable, incisive and elegant... good humoured and eminently practical - the "Lonely Planet" guide to the field' - Professor John Connell, Sydney University

'A very welcome and richly inviting review of the politics, ethics and practicalities of fieldwork, Development Fieldwork deserves reading in many 'fields'. This will surely travel far' - James D Sidaway, National University of Singapore

'I warmly commend this guide to anyone planning or even thinking about fieldwork in the Third World. Postgraduates and academics will find it particularly good, as it not only raises an abundance of practical and logistical points but explores fundamental ethical and epistemological

concerns to an unusual degree, including issues not addressed elsewhere. The clarity and attention to detail are also very welcome, as is the ease with which the book can be navigated' - Janet Townsend, University of Durham

`Developmental Fieldwork provides a useful guide packed with information on practical and personal (and sometimes political) matters. As with all good `rough' guides, rather than fixing options and closing issues, the authors make it a point to suggest flexible itineraries across the terrain of the `field'. The book should in time become a well-thumbed, dog-eared volume, thrown into the haversack along with the notebook (both sorts), tape recorder, mosquito repellent, sunglasses and sturdy shoes' - Brenda S A Yeoh, National University of Singapore

Development Fieldwork provides an indispensable new resource and guide for all students undertaking development fieldwork in the Third World.

Accessible and lively, the text:

- introduces the basics of research design and methodology together with guidance on choosing the best research methods;

- provides `hands on' advice (practical, personal and ethical) to those preparing to enter `the field';

- covers the initial planning and preparation stages to end writing up and tips for the successful resumption of life back home.

The authors draw upon a rich and diverse set of fieldwork experiences across the developing world (rural and urban) and utilize case studies to illustrate the many common issues and challenges that will face both new and experienced fieldwork researchers.

It will be an essential text and companion to all postgraduate and research students across the social sciences.

Regina Scheyvens and Donovan Storey
Introduction
 
PART ONE: METHODOLOGY
Warwick E Murray and John Overton
Designing Development Research
John Overton and Peter van Dierman
Using Quantitative Techniques
Dan Brockington and Sian Sullivan
Qualitative Research
 
PART TWO: PREPARATION FOR THE FIELD
Helen Leslie and Donovan Storey
Practical Issues
Henry Scheyvens and Barbara Nowak
Personal Issues
 
PART THREE: IN THE FIELD
Helen Leslie and Donovan Storey
Entering the Field
Regina Scheyvens, Barbara Nowak and Henry Scheyvens
Ethical Issues
Regina Scheyvens, Henry Scheyvens and Warwick E Murray
Working with Marginalized, Vulnerable and Privileged Groups
 
PART FOUR: LEAVING THE FIELD
Sara Kindon and Julie Cupples
Anything to Declare? The Politics and Practicalities of Leaving the Field
Julie Cupples and Sara Kindon
Returning to University and Writing the Field
Donovan Storey and Regina Scheyvens
Afterword

`Every now and then one stumbles across a breath of fresh air and this practical research guide is certainly one of them!.. it will be no doubt refreshing for those of us who keep going to the field and who perhaps have forgotten the human dimension or research. For those who supervise students the book will be a useful source of inspiration.... I shall certainly recommend the book to any of my students' - Development and Change

`Development Fieldwork is an excellent examination of and preparation for development research and will be an invaluable guise to all those entering or considering fieldwork, wherever that amy be' - Progress in Development Studies

'This is an outstanding book, and one that all of us engaged in fieldwork in "developing countries" will want to read and doubtless re-read. Thoughtful, relevant and consistently well-written' - Professor Stuart Corbridge, London School of Economics and University of Miami

'An excellent overview of the pitfalls and problems of fieldwork in remote places... elegant and enjoyable, incisive and elegant... good humoured and eminently practical - the Lonely Planet guide to the field' - Professor John Connell, Sydney University

'A very welcome and richly inviting review of the politics, ethics and practicalities of fieldwork, Development Fieldwork deserves reading in many 'fields'. This will surely travel far' - James D Sidaway, National University of Singapore

'I warmly commend this guide to anyone planning or even thinking about fieldwork in the Third World. Postgraduates and academics will find it particularly good, as it not only raises an abundance of practical and logistical points but explores fundamental ethical and epistemological

concerns to an unusual degree, including issues not addressed elsewhere. The clarity and attention to detail are also very welcome, as is the ease with which the book can be navigated' - Janet Townsend, University of Durham

`Developmental Fieldwork provides a useful guide packed with information on practical and personal (and sometimes political) matters. As with all good `rough' guides, rather than fixing options and closing issues, the authors make it a point to suggest flexible itineraries across the terrain of the `field'. The book should in time become a well-thumbed, dog-eared volume, thrown into the haversack along with the notebook (both sorts), tape recorder, mosquito repellent, sunglasses and sturdy shoes' - Brenda S A Yeoh, National University of Singapore

'I recently read "Development Fieldwork: A Practical Guide" and found it to be absolutely fantastic. I am the only honours student in my School planning to do development fieldwork this year and was feeling a little overwhelmed- especially as so many people continually remind me that I am making things difficult for myself by undertaking fieldwork abroad. It is really encouraging to find a book aimed at students like me and covering all the issues which are unique to development fieldwork' - Kyra Peake, Student, Australian National University


This book was useful in helping me conduct a session on fieldwork in developing nations. This book is particularly useful to these students as they will be conducting research projects in Nepal as part of the module requirements.

Primarily the book offers insights into what it is like to conduct research within developing nations, the idea of which some students may find daunting at first. The book is presented in short chapters which typically reflect the chronological stages of a field work module. Namely the reader is introduced to advice and guidance on creating good research proposals. The essential concepts of quantitative and qualitative research at level 6 are provided with cross references to a number of academic sources, as well as an introduction to deeper epistemological values behind the methodologies.

The book also lends itself to being somewhat of travel advisor, giving practical advice on what to expect and how to conduct oneself in the field. These range from personal considerations such as health, culture shock, what to take to practical advice on how to behave in unusual countries. However these considerations are re-enforced with a range of real-life examples which help to illustrate how the reader can turn these scenarios into research environments and thus widen their ontology and enrich their research.

This is especially relevant to my sociology students, many of which have not had the chance to visit a developing country before, let alone conduct research there. Although the book shall continue to be used as supplementary, it is being recommended to students in particular as its compact style and size make it a convenient and concise read.

Mr Richard George
School of Social Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University
November 27, 2012

Sample Materials & Chapters

PDF file of Chapter 9


Preview this book

Regina Scheyvens

Regina Scheyvens heads the Institute of Development Studies at Massey University, New Zealand. She combines a passion for teaching about international development with research on tourism and development. She has a particular interest in sustainable development options for people living in small island states. In addition to Development Fieldwork, Regina has published books on Tourism and Poverty (2010) and Tourism for Development: Empowering Communities (2002), along with articles on topics such as backpacker tourism, ecotourism, sustainable tourism and empowerment. More About Author

Donovan Storey

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