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Statistical Graphics for Visualizing Multivariate Data
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Statistical Graphics for Visualizing Multivariate Data

  • William G. Jacoby - Michigan State University, USA, University of South Carolina, Colombia


112 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc
This book explores a variety of graphical displays that are useful for visualizing multivariate data. The basic problem involves representing information that varies along several dimensions when the display medium (a computer screen or printed page) is inherently two-dimensional. In order to address this problem, William G Jacoby introduces the concept of a `data space'.
 
Introduction
 
Multiple-Code Plotting Symbols in Scatterplots
 
Profile Plots
 
Three-Dimensional Plots for Trivariate Data
 
The Scatterplot Matrix
 
Conditioning Plots
 
The Biplot
 
Conclusions

William G. Jacoby

William G. Jacoby is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University. He is also a Research Scientist at the University of Michigan, where he serves as Director of the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Summer Training Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research.Professor Jacoby joined the MSU faculty in 2003. Previously, he held positions at the University of South Carolina, Ohio State University, and the University of Missouri. He received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 1983.Professor Jacoby's main professional interests are mass... More About Author

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